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4/3/2018

Software Technology Fills Holes in 3D Scans

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MachineWorks, creator of Polygonica polygonal modeling software engine, has developed a solution for complex hole filling in a point cloud of the 3D object.

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MachineWorks, creator of Polygonica polygonal modeling software engine, has developed a solution for complex hole filling in a point cloud of a 3D object. The software function fills missing regions or holes in 3D models produced by 3D scanners by recapturing the original geometry with geometry manipulation.

The company has developed algorithms benefiting from multi-threaded code to improve the performance of hole filling so that the model is completed quickly. The company has also developed methods for larger holes. It has tested different complexities and sizes to improve overall performance.

A new fill type matches the features on opposite sides of a hole and extends them across the hole. This can give a much better mesh result than finding a minimum area or smooth fill for the hole, according to the company.

The software also effectively fills annular holes (holes with one or more islands inside them). It fills the outer hole while keeping the detail given by the islands. This fill type automatically matches features to determine which islands belong to which hole, producing good results for filling holes in challenging scanned objects.

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