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11/4/2017 | 1 MINUTE READ

Solid Rock is Thermally Stable Horizontal Machining Center

Originally titled 'Horizontal Machining Center is Thermally Stable'
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Starrag’s Heckert Solid Rock machining centers combine water-cooled main drive motors and ballscrews, a temperature-controlled structure, a natural granite machine bed and thermal compensation of the linear and rotary axes. 

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Starrag’s Heckert Solid Rock machining centers use a combination of water-cooled main drive motors and ballscrews, plus a temperature-controlled structure, a natural granite machine bed and thermal compensation of the linear and rotary axes to be a thermally stable horizontal machining center. These levels of machine accuracy result in component quality and low tool wear, the company says.

A positioning accuracy of just 4 microns in linear axes and only 4 secs of arc in the NC rotary table applies to the four-machine Heckert HEC 1000/1250/1600/1800 models. The four machines boast X, Y and Z axes travels from 1,700 mm × 1,250 mm × 1,850 mm (on the HEC 1000) up to 3,400 mm × 2,800 mm × 2,250 mm (HEC 1800).

According to the company, the use of a jacket creates a machine base that is thermally insulated against ambient temperatures and internal heat sources. A temperature control system keeps structural components at a constant temperature and eliminates fluctuations between foundation and machine base and bed.

In addition, the granite bed offers similar static and dynamic properties as a steel version but no thermal disadvantages nor magnetic or corrosion issues, the company says. Also, the use of water-cooled motors and ballscrews allows uniform heat control and, in terms of the ballscrews, heat dissipation. Routines in the machines’ CNC system include functionality that corrects tool center point displacements.

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