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6/2/2009

Subspindle Turning System Designed For Large Diameters

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Bardons & Oliver’s Big Bore subspindle machine is designed for challenging through-hole applications. The heavy-duty, column-style machine can process complex bar and tube components with virtually no limitations on diameter, weight or length, the company says.

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Bardons & Oliver’s Big Bore subspindle machine is designed for challenging through-hole applications. The heavy-duty, column-style machine can process complex bar and tube components with virtually no limitations on diameter, weight or length, the company says.

When the subspindle machine is combined with the company’s automatic bar feed system and finished-part unloader, the fully automated operation can produce complete parts with complex machining on both ends.

The flexible 12- and 15-station turret and tooling systems are designed to handle heavy cuts and hold precision tolerances. Tool heads are sized for 1" or 1.25" square-shank toolholders and boring bars with diameters ranging to 3".

Standard collet chuck sizes for the supspindle line range from 3" to 8.50". Finished parts can be produced in lengths ranging from 6" to 30 ft long.

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