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3/4/2005

System Designed For High Accuracy

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The Micro-Hite 3D coordinate measuring system from Brown & Sharpe Tesa is designed to fill the operational gap between precision hand-held measuring instruments and “high-end” coordinate measuring machines. The system features an alloy base fitted with a granite measuring table.

The Micro-Hite 3D coordinate measuring system from Brown & Sharpe Tesa is designed to fill the operational gap between precision hand-held measuring instruments and “high-end” coordinate measuring machines.

The system features an alloy base fitted with a granite measuring table. The customized optoelectronic measuring system, developed in conjunction with the company’s Micro-Hite Electronic Height Gage, provides repeatability to 3 µm.

According to the company, the offset triangular bridge design provides a low center of gravity and optimum stiffness-to-mass ratio.  Air bearings offer virtually frictionless motion in all three axes. The measuring volume is 15.74" (460 mm) × 17.71" (510 mm) × 19.68" (420 mm).

Another standard feature is the Reflex software, which allows operators of various skill levels to perform 1D, 2D and 3D measurement routines without the need for computer keyboard entries. Operations are controlled through an ergonomically positioned control panel, and the Zmouse provides control of the system from anywhere in the work envelope.

The TesaStar  Touch Trigger Probe or the TesaStar-I Indexable Probe are included, both of which feature adjustable trigger force from 0.1 N to 0.3 N. Additionally, the TesaStar-I is adjustable to 168 positions in 15-degree increments.

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