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Techniks' Triton Hydraulic Chucks Provide Increased Toolholding Power

IMTS Spark: Techniks has expanded its line of hydraulic tool holders with the Triton line of hydraulic chucks.
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Techniks Triton

Techniks has expanded its line of hydraulic tool holders with the Triton line of hydraulic chucks. The chucks feature a thicker wall construction and more compact hydraulic design that concentrates the clamping force on the tool shank, increasing holding power up to 400% compared standard hydraulic chucks, the company says. The increased holding power enables Triton chucks to be used for heavy milling applications in addition to more typical operations like drilling, reaming, thread milling and finish milling.

The hydraulic reservoir around the bore provides vibration-damping properties that reduce chatter in the cut, improving surface finish and enhancing tool life. Tool changes are performed with a hex wrench. Triton chucks have a repeatable accuracy of under 0.003 micron at 3×D and are balanced to a minimum of 25,000 rpm at 2.5 Gs for high-speed applications. CAT- and BT-tapered Triton chucks can provide through-spindle as well as AD+B flange coolant. 

The chucks can hold shank diameters ranging from 1/8" to 1 1/4" by using reduction sleeves. Techniks also offers reduction sleeves treated with its TTG-594 compound, said to increase the holding power. Triton chucks are available in standard and dual-contact CAT 40/50, standard and dual-contact BT 30/40, and HSK 63A/100A.

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