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8/7/2017

Trochoidal End Mills Increase Metal Removal Rates

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Emuge announces its line of solid carbide end mills for trochoidal milling.

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Emuge announces its line of solid carbide end mills for trochoidal milling. The company says the end mills increase metal removal rates over 30 percent, reduce tool paths, extend tool life and enable axial depth cuts as high as 4×D. They are designed to optimize the calculation of milling paths and avoid unproductive tool motion for advanced milling strategies in CAM software.

The end mills feature variable spacing, variable helix angles and improved micro-geometries for low vibration, as well as TiN/TiALN or ALCR coatings and a submicron-grain carbide substrate. The chipbreaker geometry is designed to reduce axial pull-out force and minimize the risk of chip buildup in pockets, since the small chips produced can be removed with compressed air or coolant.

They are available in two geometries: Jet-CutTM for roughing and finishing steel, and coolant-through TiNox-CutTM for process-reliable roughing of tough materials such as Inconel, titanium and stainless steel. Standard and long-length rougher and finishers with flute length-to-diameter ratios of 2-1, 3-1 and 4-1 are available.

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