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9/16/2017

Trochoidal End Mills Minimize Risk of Chip Buildup

Originally titled 'End Mills Minimize Risk of Chip Buildup'
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Emuge Corp.’s Trochoidal line of solid carbide end mills with unique geometry and chip breakers are designed specifically for trochoidal milling. They provide increased metal removal rates, fewer tool paths and longer tool life, while enabling a high axial depth of cut.

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Emuge Corp.’s Trochoidal line of solid carbide end mills with unique geometry and chip breakers are designed specifically for trochoidal milling. They provide increased metal removal rates (MRR) of over 30 percent, fewer tool paths and longer tool life, while enabling a high axial depth of cut of up to 4XD, the company says.

The Trochoidal end mills feature low vibration characteristics such as variable spacing, variable helix angles and improved micro-geometries, along with high-performance coatings of TiN/TiALN or ALCR and a sub-micro grain carbide substrate. According to the company, the chip breaker geometry reduces axial pull-out force and minimizes the risk of chip buildup in pockets, since the resulting smaller chips can be removed with compressed air or coolant.

Emuge Trochoidal end mills are available in two cutting geometries: Jet-Cut for both roughing and finishing in steel applications, and Coolant-Through TiNox-Cut for process-reliable roughing in tough materials such as Inconel, titanium and stainless steel. Standard and long-length rougher/finishers with flute length/diameter ratios of 2:1, 3:1 and 4:1 are available for applications in a range of materials.

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