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Tsugami Enhances B-Axis Swiss-Type Lathe with Larger Linear Guides

IMTS Spark: Tsugami/Rem Sales announces enhancements to the Tsugami SS327-III-5AX, a 32-mm, B-Axis, chucker-convertible Swiss-type CNC lathe.
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The exterior of a B-axis Swiss-type lathe from Tsugami.

Tsugami/Rem Sales announces enhancements to the Tsugami SS327-III-5AX, a 32-mm, B-Axis, chucker-convertible Swiss-type CNC lathe. The machine now comes standard with larger linear guides, more ribs in the base casting, a 4-GB data server, thermal displacement compensation sensors, and a three-toggle clamping system.

This Swiss-types servo-driven, modular B-axis enables milling, drilling and tapping at virtually angle for single-setup, complex-part machining. Other features and capabilities include through-hole thread-whirling; high-speed spindles for small surfacing end mills; four front and two rear B-axis tools that coordinate with the C axis for angles and contours.

The modular tool zone is designed for easy changing of cartridge-type live cross and face tools on the B-axis and the sub side. Using the same tool for multiple angle cuts l also decreases the required number of tools.

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