Turn-Mill Center Features Eight-Position Turret

Available from Advanced Machinery Solutions, the Lico LND D series CNC turn-mill centers are capable of producing complex parts in fast cycle times.

Available from Advanced Machinery Solutions, the Lico LND D series CNC turn-mill centers are capable of producing complex parts in fast cycle times. The turn-mill machine features an eight-position turret that accommodates four tools in each position, and can be ordered with live tooling in all positions. The turret can perform ID work on both spindles simultaneously and overlap with OD turning from the two-axis cross-slides. The machine is equipped with two cross-slides, and two more can be added as an option. According to the company, the cross-slides can provide the same performance as a two- or three-turret twin-spindle CNC lathe. Both spindles feature a full C axis. The turn-mill center can also be equipped with a Y axis, or a live tool gang slide to make it a double C, double Y machine. The turn-mill is available in spindle sizes ranging to 100 mm (4.00"). An optional overhead parts catcher prevents damage to heavy parts.

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