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2/13/2018 | 1 MINUTE READ

User-Friendly Tool Presetter Reduces Human Error

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SST introduces the 4200 tool presetter, designed for boosting efficiency and profitability in high-precision part manufacturing.

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SST introduces the 4200 tool presetter designed for boosting efficiency and profitability in high-precision part manufacturing. It provides shops with improved precision through tool measurement accuracy of ±0.003 mm (0.00012") and user-friendly features to help eliminate human error. The company worked with Zoller to engineer the tool presetter.

Constructed from heavy-duty aircraft aluminum, the presetter reduces errors from thermal expansion. Its spindle features actuated clamping of toolholders, like that of a machine tool, for measurement accuracy with spindle concentricity of 0.002 mm (0.000079"), according to the company.

Image processing and crosshair technologies capture and measure features of the tool’s cutting edge in the micron range. Automatic X, Z and C axes as well as auto-focusing camera speed measurement, setting and testing help to eliminate human error. The touchscreen control is designed to minimize training and ease access to tool data, photographs, drawings and 3D images via a scalable tool management system.

To facilitate tool traceability within shops, the product comes with a thermo-label printer and can be equipped with an optional RFID system. The device can interface with other tool data management systems to track tooling across systems and processes, enabling equipment such as robots and other machines to read and write stored data for more reliable, versatile and efficient unattended processing.

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