Vise Features Adjustable Center Jaws

Dapra’s Allmatic Centro Gripp vise features adjustable center jaws to enable five-axis machining during the complete machining process.

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Dapra’s Allmatic Centro Gripp vise features adjustable center jaws to enable five-axis machining during the complete machining process. With a compact design, the high-pressure vise is well-suited for high-precision machining on both horizontal and vertical five-axis machining centers. A fully enclosed high-pressure spindle provides a clamping force force ranging to 40 kN (8,992 lbs) and is said to require minimal maintenance.

The vise enables access to five sides of the workpiece in a single setup through multiple clamping positions without the need to retool its jaws. The jaw width of the vise is 125 mm (5") with clamping ranges from 10 to 300 mm (0.394" to 11.811"). Large lateral outlets facilitate chip removal and maintenance. Constructed of cast iron GGG-60, the vise features precision aligning slots and a positioning hole on the bottom of the vise, as well as pre-machined holes in the vise shoulders for mounting directly to a table.

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