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1/18/2017

VMC Features Larger Work Envelope, Smaller Footprint

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Okuma’s Genos M560-V vertical machining center combines a high-column design and CAT 40 Big Plus spindle to cut large, complex parts.

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Okuma’s Genos M560-V vertical machining center combines a high-column design and CAT 40 Big Plus spindle to cut large, complex parts. The larger work envelope minimizes restrictions on workpieces, tool lengths and the rotary table. A highly rigid, thermally-stable, double-column construction gives this CNC machine the ability to withstand thermal deformation, resulting in improved machining performance, the company says.

A 30-hp spindle with 146 foot-pounds of torque enables the VMC to cut challenging metals such as titanium and Inconel as well as stainless steel and aluminum. A separate automatic toolchanger (ATC) door enables seamless tool changing without interrupting the machining process. The table moves only in the Y axis, while the spindle moves in the X and Z axes, enabling a smaller machine design and providing rapid feed rates, precise cutting and smooth surface finishes.

The machine includes Okuma’s Thermo-Friendly Concept thermal deformation compensation technology. Pretension ballscrews and bidirectional spindle cooling enable better control of the machining process. Optional Collision Avoidance and Machining Navi Intelligent Technologies are also available.

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