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3/7/2008

Wiper Geometries For High-Feed Milling

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Helix wiper geometries for operations in high-feed machining of case-hardened steels where standard wipers cannot be used because of vibrations caused by a weak setup or lower radial cutting forces. Seco's Helix concept is designed to reduce vibrations, increase tool life and the parts produced per cutting edge. It has a wiper on both sides of the corner radii (as the standard), but the protection chamfer is twisted from negative to positive, or from positive to negative.

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Helix wiper geometries for operations in high-feed machining of case-hardened steels where standard wipers cannot be used because of vibrations caused by a weak setup or lower radial cutting forces. Seco's Helix concept is designed to reduce vibrations, increase tool life and the parts produced per cutting edge. It has a wiper on both sides of the corner radii (as the standard), but the protection chamfer is twisted from negative to positive, or from positive to negative.

These wiper geometries enable the operator to obtain a very smooth surface by lessening the effect of the workpiece feed pattern created during conventional turning. Quality finished surfaces rivaling those of grinding can be achieved when using this type of wiper insert. The wipers are available in brazed format CBN050C or a coated, low CBN grade.

The company's family of low-content CBN inserts covers the range of turning operations from continuous, light interrupted to heavy interrupted and feeds as high as 300 m/min.

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