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Wire EDM Improves Positional Accuracy

IMTS 2018: Makino’s UP6 Heat Wire EDM is designed for precision stamping and fine blanking applications.

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Makino’s UP6 Heat wire EDM is designed for precision stamping and fine blanking applications. It is also suitable for die tooling for electric motor stators. The machine features a stationary work table designed to improve positional accuracy, and it uses a programmable, rise-and-fall, three-sided work tank that improves ergonomic access to the work zone. This configuration also simplifies requirements for automation.

Several features are designed to improve long-term thermal stability, including integration of the dielectric fluid reservoir into the base casting of the machine. Chilled dielectric fluid is circulated through the machine’s casting to facilitate active thermal cooling and maintain machine temperature. The machine uses a Hyper-i control with a 24" HD touchscreen, which comes with the HyperConnect Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) network-connectivity function for remote machine monitoring.

A wire-drive system uses AC motor tensioning, which expands the range and stability of wire tension and reduces maintenance requirements. A wire-threading system provides both jet and jet-less threading modes. It can rethread the wire in the gap at a break point.

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