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2/27/2018 | 1 MINUTE READ

Zero-Point Clamping System Facilitates Multi-Axis Machining

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Big Kaiser’s Uniflex three-dimensional, zero-point clamping system is designed to allow parts with curved surfaces to be held rigidly for various operations and to be adjusted to different height requirements.

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Big Kaiser’s Uniflex three-dimensional, zero-point clamping system is designed to allow parts with curved surfaces to be held rigidly for various operations and to be adjusted to different height requirements. The system is available in two sizes accommodating diameters up to 25.4 and 50 mm, respectively. The two sizes available enable users to work with small or large workpieces like weldments and castings. The product is intended to meet the increasing demand for accessible multi-axis machining options. 

The Uniflex system is composed of a clamping ball and collar that are attached to the underside of a part or fixture. The clamping ball is a hardened steel ball of the same type found in heavy-duty industrial bearings. This material prevents peening or denting of its surface with normal use. Once the clamping ball and collar are attached, the part and fixture are then lowered onto either a clamping base or a clamping extension. The clamping collar is then rotated to tighten the six bearing balls onto the main ball. If the part or fixture is warped or needs to be set at an angle, the clamping ball can pivot as far as either 15 degrees from vertical with 18 mm of height adjustability or 40 degrees with 20 mm of height adjustability. The 50-mm system features a larger-size clamping ball, enabling it to work with larger, heavier, uneven parts and providing more rigidity.

Balls are offered in two types. The location type uses a 25-mm-diameter location collar, while a grip type has serrations to grab the part. Grip type is not to be used on finished surfaces.

This system provides vibration-free holding of the part when multiple clamping is used and offers low wear against tools. It can stabilize the workpieces without obstructing access to the top and sides of the part.

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