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End Mill Comparisons in CFRP, Part 2 - Diamond-Coated Tool

Video shows the performance of coated carbide, diamond-coated, PCD and veined PCD tools in carbon fiber reinforced plastic. Part two in a four-part series.
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Smith MegaDiamond Inc. and Star Cutter Company compared the performance of various end mills in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP). The tools tested included a coated carbide end mill, a diamond-coated end mill, a conventional PCD end mill with straight flutes, and a “veined” PCD end mll featuring a vein of PCD within a helical slot in a carbide tool body.

The table below summarizes the test parameters. Shown here is the video of a 10-degree helical diamond-coated tool. Jeff Michael, engineering manager for Star Cutter, comments, “Again, the sound is pretty good with this cutter, but uncut fibers appear immediately. This is because a tool’s coating tends to give it a more rounded cutting edge, making it more difficulty to cut the fibers cleanly off.”

To see the next video in this testing, click here.

 

 

 

Tool Type

Ø .500 in.

Solid Carbide

CVD Diamond

PCD

Veined PCD

 

Flute angle

30° helical

10° helical

7° skew

30° helical

 

Spindle speed (rpm)

3,000

4,600

12,000

18,000

 

Chip load (in./tooth)

0.0035

0.0035

0.001

0.0065

Machine advance (in./min.)

42

64

36

470

 

Radial depth (in.)

.050

.050

.050

.050

Cutting speeds and feed rates were recommended parameters from each tool’s manufacturer.

 

Editor’s note: To read the next part in the series, click here. 

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