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1/27/2009

Finishing Walls In Titanium

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Machining animation from Boeing illustrates effective techniques for titanium workpieces. This video shows material machined out of the corners prior to finishing.

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This machining simulation provided by Boeing Research and Technology (using CGTech software) illustrates some of the practices of effective milling of titanium that are detailed in articles under “Editor Picks” at right.

After the initial roughing, the video shows material machined out of the corners prior to finishing. This is followed by finish milling at successive layers instead of milling the full wall depth at once. These fast finishing passes are often performed using an end mill with many flutes—such as a 5-, 10- or even 20-flute tool.

Find details in the articles at right. Or, see other videos in this series:
2. Video: Finishing A Pocket Floor In Titanium
3. Video: Plunge-And-Sweep For Finishing Corners

 

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