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2/11/2011

Video: Cryogenic Machining of Titanium

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Through-tool liquid nitrogen turns the tool into a heat sink, extending tool life.

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This video from MAG shows milling of titanium using the company’s minimum-quantity approach to cryogenic machining. This cryogenic system delivers liquid nitrogen through the tool at a low flow rate, which has the effect of turning the tool into a heat sink. The white mist in this video is the liquid nitrogen turning to gas as soon as it touches the air. The white on the tool is frost produced by the low temperature, despite the heat of machining. This method of tool cooling has delivered dramatic gains in tool life, particularly in heat-resistant metals. For a more detailed article, see the item under “Editor Picks” at right.
 

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