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11/15/2011

Video: Five-Axis Machining at Chicago Mold Engineering

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This mold maker describes its use of both tilting-spindle and tilting-table five-axis machines.

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Chicago Mold Engineering of St. Charles, Illinois uses both tilting-spindle and tilting-table five-axis machines. This video from MMSOnline video contributor Todd Schuett describes why the shop is committed to five-axis machining, and how it views these two different five-axis machine types. 

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