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Video: Getting the Most Out of Your Standard Spindle

High spindle speed is not needed for high productivity, particularly with the right choice of cutting tool types. Techniques described in this tutorial video relate to plunge roughing, high feed milling and slotting.
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High spindle speed is not needed for high productivity. Techniques described in this tutorial video relate to plunge roughing, high feed milling and slotting. Here is more information on each of the cutting applications that this video shows:

1.  Plunge milling using the side of the tool on a horizontal spindle at Patterson Mold. The tool is a 52-mm high feed tool from Emuge Franken with 4 inserts plunging at 52 ipm.

2. Large drill plunging at Craftsman Mold. The 3.25-inch-diameter tool is from Komet.

3. Helical milling of a big hole at Craftsman Mold. The tool is a 2-inch button cutter from Hitachi.

4. High feed milling at Craftsman Mold. The tools is a 1-inch Diejet high feed mill.
 

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