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7/19/2010

Video: Two-Spindle Machine Turns and Mills Turbo Housings

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This five-axis, two-spindle machining center shows how multitasking machines can be used for production applications.

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Multitasking machines that can turn and mill parts in one setup offer a great deal of process flexibility. The five-axis, two-spindle Stama machine shown in this video demonstrates how such versatility can be applied to production environments. This MC 826 MT-Twin machine mills and turns two automotive turbocharger housings simultaneously.

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