Metal Cutting

Turning Machines

“Turning” defines the work that is traditionally done on a lathe. As lathes have grown in sophistication, some of these machines have been given different names. “Turning centers” is a term sometimes applied to machines with particularly sophisticated capabilities related to secondary spindles and/or rotating tools for milling and drilling. Another term, “turn/mill machines,” describes machines that can be thought of as being just as capable at milling and drilling parts as they are at turning. In turning, unlike in milling or drilling, the workpiece spins while the cutting tool does not. The cutting tool feeds along the length or diameter of the rotating part. The workpiece in turning can be held in a chuck or collet, to name two of the more common workholding methods. The turning machine may also include spindles for the cutting tools to accomplish non-turning operations such as milling and drilling. If this is the case, the machine stops the workpiece from spinning in order to perform these operations within the same machining cycle as the turning work. In fact, for some parts, the milling and drilling capabilities may be used so extensively that a non-turned, non-round part might also be produced on this type of machine. Lathes, turning centers and turn-mill machines can have horizontal or vertical spindles. Horizontal spindles are more common. If the machine has a vertical spindle, then the spindle may locate below or above the machine. If the workpiece rests on a table driven by the spindle, then this machine is generally called a vertical turret lathe, or VTL. If the workpiece is held from above by the vertical spindle, then this type of turning machine is generally called an inverted vertical lathe.

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Emag LV seris vertical pick-up lathe

Vertical Pick-Up Lathes Reduce Floor Space Requirements

By: Edited by Stephanie Monsanty
Emag’s VL series vertical pick-up lathes feature a shared compact design for flexible machining.

Mazak Quick Turn Universal 250MSY turning center

CNC Turning Center Enables Multitasking, Automation

By: Edited by Stephanie Monsanty
Mazak will showcase its Quick Turn Universal (QTU) 250MSY turning center designed for shops focused on small parts production.

Hwacheon Machinery VT-950/1150 vertical CNC lathe

Vertical Lathe Series Turns Large Parts

By: Edited by Stephanie Monsanty
Hwacheon Machinery’s VT-950/1150 series of vertical CNC lathes is intended for large-part turning.

Large CNC Multi-Spindle

By: Lori Beckman (editor)
If you like the high speed of rotary transfer machines, the precision and quick change-over of CNC machines and the advantage of precise run-out and concentricity from bar machines, the ZPS TMZ eight-spindle CNC multi-spindle screw machine could be the answer to you our questions and will also keep your change-over costs affordable.

Tongtai Q5 CNC lathe

CNC Lathe Speeds Small-Part Production

By: Edited by Stephanie Monsanty
Available from Absolute Machine Tools, the Tongtai Q5 CNC gang-type lathe is a compact machine with a footprint of about 60" × 75" (1,490 × 1870-mm), designed for fast production of small parts.


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