Metal Cutting

Turning Machines

“Turning” defines the work that is traditionally done on a lathe. As lathes have grown in sophistication, some of these machines have been given different names. “Turning centers” is a term sometimes applied to machines with particularly sophisticated capabilities related to secondary spindles and/or rotating tools for milling and drilling. Another term, “turn/mill machines,” describes machines that can be thought of as being just as capable at milling and drilling parts as they are at turning. In turning, unlike in milling or drilling, the workpiece spins while the cutting tool does not. The cutting tool feeds along the length or diameter of the rotating part. The workpiece in turning can be held in a chuck or collet, to name two of the more common workholding methods. The turning machine may also include spindles for the cutting tools to accomplish non-turning operations such as milling and drilling. If this is the case, the machine stops the workpiece from spinning in order to perform these operations within the same machining cycle as the turning work. In fact, for some parts, the milling and drilling capabilities may be used so extensively that a non-turned, non-round part might also be produced on this type of machine. Lathes, turning centers and turn-mill machines can have horizontal or vertical spindles. Horizontal spindles are more common. If the machine has a vertical spindle, then the spindle may locate below or above the machine. If the workpiece rests on a table driven by the spindle, then this machine is generally called a vertical turret lathe, or VTL. If the workpiece is held from above by the vertical spindle, then this type of turning machine is generally called an inverted vertical lathe.

Featured Zone Content

How Center Rock Sees Setups


The company that made the rock drills used to free the Chilean miners last year is exploring the right level of multitask machining.

Incremental Automation


This machine tool supplier sees shops searching for just a little bit of unattended capacity. Many shops are closer to obtaining this extra capacity than they realize.

Robot in lean shop

The Responsiveness Robot


For this lean shop dedicated to low-inventory kanban relationships with customers, the most critical measure of efficiency revealed the value of robotic loading.



Multitasking Helps Detroit Shop

By: Edited by: Chris Koepfer
Brothers Arnot and Matt Heller are 30-something, degreed engineers running Central Screw Products and Detroit Gun Works. They are also fourth generation, hands-on machinists and know a thing or two about machine tools, automation and the critical role of new technology in business growth.

Mazak Integrex e-420H II multitasking machine

Multitasking Machine Processes Large Shaft-Type Workpieces

By:
Mazak’s Integrex e-420H II multitasking machine offers high-powered turning and full-function machining capabilities suitable for a range of industries, including construction machinery, marine and energy.

Doosan Puma GT2100 series turning center

Compact Turning Centers Improve Accuracy, Reliability

By:
The Puma GT2100 8" and 10" turning centers from Doosan are based on the company’s Puma 240 machines, with compact footprints and improved accuracy and reliability.

Nexturn’s P series SA 38PY Swiss-type lathe (available from Absolute Machine Tools) offers eight axes and 38-mm front and rear bar capacity. The lathe’s guide bushing can be removed to enable the use of less-expensive cold-drawn barstock and minimize the size of bar remnants left after machining.

April 2014 Product Spotlight: Turning

By:
Click through this month’s product slideshow featuring lathes and turning centers.

TUE-100 VerticalT Lathe Designed for High Speed, Heavy Duty Cutting

By: Lori Beckman (editor)
Toshiba Machine Co., America’s TUE-100 vertical turning lathe is designed for high speed, heavy duty cutting with a max load up to 4,400 lbs.


FUJI machines are built for automation from the ground up.
MMS ONLINE
Channel Partners
  • Techspex