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Drills Tackle Tough Materials, Flat Holes

IMTS 2018: OSG USA’s A-Drill series of carbide drills covers a range of applications and materials. 

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OSG USA’s A-Drill series includes the Exocard AD, ADO, ADO-SUS and ADF drills. 

Suitable for both ferrous and non-ferrous materials, the Exocarb AD and ADO carbide drills are designed to provide high point strength with low cutting force. EgiAs coating, which features high wear and heat resistance characteristics, contributes to extended tool life.  A coolant-through option is available.

The Exocarb ADO-SUS coolant-fed carbide drill features a coolant hole shape and tool geometry designed specifically for drilling difficult-to-machine materials like stainless steel and titanium.

The Exocarb ADF carbide flat drill is designed to machine flat holes without a separate end mill. One-step drilling reduces machining time and eases tool management. It is designed for work on inclined surfaces and curved surfaces and can perform counterboring, eccentric-hole and thin-plate operations.

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