4/13/2017

Ergonomic, Small-Part Grinder Conserves Floorspace

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Eastec 2017: Haas Schleifmaschinen, represented in the United States by Haas Multigrind, will present its compact all-rounder Multigrind CU.

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Haas Schleifmaschinen, represented in the United States by Haas Multigrind, will present its compact all-rounder Multigrind CU. Designed for high productivity in a small footprint, the machine offers robust, precise five- or six-axis kinematics, grinding wheel and coolant nozzle changer, onboard wheel dressing, integral probing, automatic part loading, and Haas Horizon programming. Capability to operate and service the machine from both the front and back enables customers to “stack” machines side-by-side to conserve floor space.

Due to its size and capacity, the Multigrind CU is said to be especially suitable for manufacturing indexable inserts, inserts, drills and other metalworking tools, as well as any other applications that require high-precision, full-sequence machining of smaller workpieces with complex geometries in one clamping.

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