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2/12/2018 | 1 MINUTE READ

Fiber Laser Quickly Marks Heavy-Wear Products

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The Foba Y.1000 100-W fiber laser marks difficult substrates as much as 40 percent faster than 50-W lasers, according to the company.

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The Foba Y.1000 100-W fiber laser from Alltec marks difficult substrates as much as 40 percent faster than 50-W lasers, according to the company. It applies robust marks on heavy-wear products to ensure abrasion-proof legibility. To meet different speed and contrast specifications for customized applications, four focal widths are available, enabling adjustments to marking field dimensions as well as marking speeds.

Marking field dimensions as large as 498 × 367 mm are possible for marking on moving products in continuous processing lines, increasing efficiency and throughput. The large marking field also speeds marking on large components or multiple marking on one product. Variable scan head tuning is available in two modes, for high-quality or high-speed purposes. It enables sharp marking results at line speeds as fast as 600 m/min.

The laser beam can be positioned in two angles, either 90 degrees top down or zero degrees straight forward, for simple integration. The system is compatible with Ethernet, RS-323, Profibus, Profinet and TCP/IP (with software version MarkUS 2.12) for easy integration into production lines.

The air-cooled system requires less laser source maintenance than water-cooled systems, according to the company. The laser source’s lifespan is also said to be longer than Nd:YAG lasers with lamps or diodes, reducing downtime due to laser source exchange.

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