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Posted by: Peter Zelinski 23. October 2014

Weldon-Flat Tools in a Precision Toolholder

Systems for locking end mills in place within a shrink-fit or hydraulic expansion toolholder, so that there is no danger of the tool pulling out during high-force cuts using a toolholder of this type, often require the shank of the tool to be modified for clamping.

However, there is one standard class of tools that already has a shank modified for clamping: tools with Weldon flats.

Schunk recently introduced a system that makes use of the Weldon flat for clamping during high-force milling with a precision holder. The system, seen here as it was displayed at this year’s IMTS, is based on the company’s Tendo line of hydraulic-expansion toolholders. As seen in this model, a metal sleeve holds the tool, clamping on the Weldon flat. That sleeve then provides the surface for the screw that locks the tool in the holder for the high-force milling typical of aerospace materials such as titanium and Inconel.


Posted by: Derek Korn 22. October 2014

Looking to Lower Lighting Costs?

The Mach LED Plus replacement lighting fixtures can provide as much as 70 percent energy savings and can be connected via a common M12 plug connector.

Although the cost of electricity in the United States is low compared to other countries, U.S. manufacturers continue to look for ways to reduce energy consumption. Lighting is one area that they commonly target. However, savings can be realized by changing not only overhead facility lighting to more efficient units, but also equipment lighting fixtures.

For example, Waldmann Lighting Company recently introduced its newest industrial fixture, the Mach LED Plus, at IMTS. The company says this energy-efficient LED upgrade for traditional fluorescent tube luminaires can provide as much as 70 percent energy savings compared to luminaires with fluorescent lamps and also offer much longer service life.

A key design element is the system’s ease of installation. The Mach LED Plus adds LED technology to the same form, dimension and connection options of fluorescent tube luminaires being used in many of today’s industrial applications. The 2.75-inch diameter enables the use of existing brackets eliminating the need to drill additional holes (specially designed brackets are available for flexible adjustment of the luminaires). These units are available in six lengths ranging from 14 to 42 inches and can be connected via an M12 plug connector to either a low-voltage (24-volt) source or 100-, 120-, or 220/240-volt sources.


Posted by: Peter Zelinski 21. October 2014

Video: Trial Cuts with Ultrasonic-Assisted Machining

A video created by Acoustech Systems includes footage of holes being drilled with and without ultrasonic-assisted machining. This company’s newly developed system is essentially a toolholder that has ultrasonic actuation built in. Adding this toolholder to the process can actually increase a shop’s machining capacity, because standard machines and tools can cut faster thanks to the friction reduction that the ultrasonic effect achieves. Comparison cuts in the video seen here show a standard drill doubling its speed and cutting more smoothly in both 1-inch-thick steel and 1-inch-thick titanium. Learn more about ultrasonic-assisted machining in this article


Posted by: Mark Albert 20. October 2014

Centerline Issues for Turning Inserts

Photos of sample inserts such as this one illustrate wear patterns that help diagnose cutting tool misalignments in turning.

Tooling expert Mike Fagan suspects that many programmers and machinists could use a refresher on the importance and effects of insert alignment in turning operations. This short, amply-illustrated paper is his effort to clear up some of the misunderstanding. 

It covers signs of misalignment and suggests ways to fix problems, with additional tips and advice to improve turning operations. To find the paper, click here.


Posted by: Peter Zelinski 17. October 2014

Sandvik Coromant Opens Newly Renovated U.S. Headquarters

An event yesterday at Sandvik Coromant's U.S. headquarters in Fair Lawn, New Jersey, celebrated the opening of a new Productivity Center (photo above), part of a now-completed 2-year renovation of this site.

The layout, architecture and offerings of the site now match other, more modern Sandvik locations both in North America and around the world. The company's original Fair Lawn site was built in 1955 and significantly expanded in 1966. Since then, priorities have shifted.

One of the priorities today is collaboration. An open design encourages movement through the facility and interaction among both employees and guests at the site. Within the Productivity Center (Sandvik's term for its training and process-development facilities), spacious machining areas equipped with sophisticated CNC machines provide capacity for company personnel to be working with various customers on various different projects at any given time. A machining area that is not so open (the ITAR-certified shop can be closed off, and frosted glass blocks the view) provides machining capacity for customer projects that are sensitive or secret.

Another priority, as company president Klas Forsström stressed in his remarks at the event, is outreach. This latest investment in the company's U.S. presence is coupled with an awareness that it needs to support manufacturing here by attracting talented people into this field. As it also does at its Chicago-area Productivity Center, for example, the company will routinely seek opportunities to bring groups of young people and their parents and teachers into the new New Jersey site in order to provide an up-to-date view of manufacturing technology, as well as an appealing glimpse at what a modern manufacturing career could look like for those who might thrive in this field.

 


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