• MMS Youtube
  • MMS Facebook
  • MMS Linkedin
  • MMS Twitter
6/14/2019 | 1 MINUTE READ

Protolabs Moving into Production-Level Additive Manufacturing Work

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

The production launch spotlights Protolabs’ effort to advance in industrial 3D printing beyond prototyping.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Protolabs has launched production capabilities for its metal 3D printing service. The new capabilities use secondary processes to improve the strength, dimensional accuracy and cosmetic appearance of metal parts. As part of the launch, enhanced inspection reporting is also being made available.

“We see it every day. The designers and engineers we work with in industries like aerospace and medtech are choosing additive manufacturing for complex components in high-requirement applications,” says Greg Thompson, global product manager for 3D printing. “These new production capabilities help them optimize their designs to enhance performance, reduce costs and consolidate supply chains, and do so much faster than ever before.”

Protolabs uses direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) technology (which is ISO 9001 and AS9100D-certified) to 3D print metal production parts. Once parts are built, several secondary options like post-process machining, tapping, reaming and heat treatments are available, along with quality control measures like powder analysis, material traceability and process validation.

The production launch spotlights Protolabs’ effort to advance in industrial 3D printing beyond prototyping. The company has joined GE’s Additive Manufacturing Network and MIT's Additive Manufacturing Consortium to facilitate this push. The company has also added capacity to support its growth with more than 25 GE Additive Concept Laser Mlab and M2 machines for DMLS production.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Metal AM in a Machine Shop? Ask the Marines

    A hybrid system combining metal 3D printing with machining gives the Marine Corps perhaps its most effective resource yet for obtaining needed hardware in the field. It also offers an extreme version of the experience a machine shop might have in adding metal AM to its capabilities.

  • Machining, Disruption and the Years Ahead

    Three major technological advancements have changed modern manufacturing. Pay attention or get left behind.

  • Video: 3D-Printed Car, Mark II

    In six weeks, Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility 3D printed a working Shelby Cobra for the Detroit Auto Show. This facility will be on of the locations for an Additive Manufacturing Conference debuting in October.

Related Topics

Resources