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Artec Micro 3D Scanner From Exact Metrology Scans Small Parts

Artec 3D’s Micro scanner, an automated desktop 3D scanner designed for tiny mechanical parts, is now available through Exact Metrology. 

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Artec 3D Micro

Exact Metrology announces the availability of the Micro scanner from Artec 3D, a developer and manufacturer of professional 3D scanners and software. The Micro is an automated, metrology-grade desktop 3D scanner and is designed for scanning tiny mechanical parts, such as engine valves or connectors, for inspection and reverse engineering, as well as other small objects for industries such as heritage preservation, dentistry and medical.

The scanner is equipped with twin cameras and blue LED lights that are synchronized with the scanner’s dual axis rotation system, creating an accurate digital copy using minimal frames. The fully automated industrial scanner creates a high-resolution color 3D scan that offers accuracy ranging to 10 microns (0.004"), a tenth the size of a single grain of table salt. The system includes a resolution of 0.029 mm (0.0011") and a 6.4 MP camera that allows for the capture of texture data.

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