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High QA's Inspection Manager Automatically Extracts GD&T Requirements from CAD

Westec 2019: High QA’s Inspection Manager quality management software includes one-click architecture to automatically extract geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (GD&T) requirements from 2D drawings and 3D models.

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High QA’s Inspection Manager quality management software includes one-click architecture to automatically extract geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (GD&T) requirements from 2D drawings and 3D models. The software digitizes the prints with automatic ballooning, creates inspection plan reports and stores all the information and measurement tools in a centralized database.

Inspection Manager also includes the ability to work in dual units and convert them in one click. The chosen unit propagates through to the ballooned PDF and the final reports, such as AS9102 FAI Forms 1 and 2. Users can store unlimited design revisions with the original and converted units.

An integrated SPC module within the software enables users to monitor variations in the manufacturing process during inspection in real time. The inspection results can be captured automatically from a range of metrology tools. Manual data can be collected on the shop floor and added in real time using a tablet application for Inspection Manager, IM Explorer and IM Express. All metrology tools, systems and certificates can also be stored and managed in the software’s centralized database. The system can alert customers when calibrations are dude and when certifications need to be updated.

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