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7/13/2018 | 1 MINUTE READ

Twin Spindle Grinder Performs Complex ID, OD Grinding

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IMTS 2018: Supertec Machinery’s EGM-350CNC twin spindle ID grinder combines an ID spindle with a secondary spindle capable of face, shoulder and OD grinding.

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Supertec Machinery’s EGM-350CNC twin spindle ID grinder supports two individually programmable spindles, combining an ID spindle with a secondary spindle capable of face, shoulder and OD grinding. The grinder can also bore with a boring bar prior to the ID grind. 

With a maximum grinding diameter of 15" and a maximum grinding depth of 10", this multi-spindle design is meant for grinding flanges, bearing races and other parts requiring the grinding of different locations on a single part. The grinder enables the operator to grind the ID, face and shoulder in a single setup. The ID spindle design features a cartridge-type, motor-driven spindle which enables simple change-over from one spindle to another. The ID spindles can range from 10,000 to 50,000 rpm, while 100,000-rpm air spindles are also available.

The secondary face-grinding spindle can handle grinding wheels ranging to 5" in diameter. NSK linear guideways and precision ballscrews on all three axes achieve increased accuracy and rigidity. The grinder features either the FANUC Oi-TF with G-code/M-code programming or the Mitsubishi M80 conversational control.

The Siemens motor with inverter drive enables variable speeds on both grinding wheel spindles. The workhead features an A2-6 spindle with an 8" three-jaw hydraulic chuck. An optional oil and mist collector and six-position automatic toolchanger (ATC) are also available.

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