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7/1/2007

When To Use A Spindle Chiller

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Because conventional spindles on machining centers are typically designed with a fixed bearing preload (no springs), there isn’t any compensation for the thermal expansion that occurs from heat generation. Higher temperatures cause the bearing raceways to expand and tighten. This causes the bearing system to increase its preload beyond the original setting, which leads to increased axial and radial loading on the bearing system.

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Because conventional spindles on machining centers are typically designed with a fixed bearing preload (no springs), there isn’t any compensation for the thermal expansion that occurs from heat generation. Higher temperatures cause the bearing raceways to expand and tighten. This causes the bearing system to increase its preload beyond the original setting, which leads to increased axial and radial loading on the bearing system. In addition to compromising the lifespan of the spindle bearing system, this thermal expansion affects accuracy.

A spindle chiller is a worthwhile investment that extends spindle life, protects accuracy, increases the machine’s capacity, and reduces maintenance costs. Refer to the chart below for basic guidelines.

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