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Advantages of a B-Axis Swiss-Type

Learn how a Northeastern shop leverages a Swiss-type lathe with a B-axis milling spindle to produce small batches of complex parts.

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The signature element of this Swiss-type machine is its B-axis milling spindle. This differs from conventional Swiss-type designs that use gang-style tools that are fixed in their orientation with the part, either perpendicular to the face or diameter of the barstock.
 

When equipped with a B-axis milling spindle, a Swiss-type lathe essentially becomes a five-axis turn-mill with the bonus of a sliding headstock. The sliding-headstock is what enables the machine to effectively turn long parts with small-diameters, while the B-axis milling spindle can approach workpieces in the machine’s main or subspindle at a variety of angles. 

Magnus Precision Manufacturing leverages this technology to produce small batches of long, complex parts. Learn more in this story.

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