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Bow Machining I

Toyoda's Stealth vertical machining center is part of a manufacturing process that bow maker Mathews Inc. uses to produce 300,000 bows per year.

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Toyoda's Stealth vertical machining center is part of a manufacturing process that bow maker Mathews Inc. uses to produce 300,000 bows per year. The machine is used to rapidly mill out the many pockets in the honeycomb-like form giving the bow its light weight. At its “Toyotech” event last week—an open house with both machining demos and technology seminars—Toyoda had the machine painted in hunting camouflage to draw attention to Mathews’ success with this VMC.

Coincidentally, this was one of two bows featured at simultaneous events by Chicago-area machine tool companies. Read about the other.

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Over a dozen machine tools were on display and/or running demos at the event,
include various large machines and systems. This flexible manufacturing system
was an example.

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