12/24/2013

It Takes Time

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To illustrate our article about the commitment to training at Progressive Turnings, a Chicago-area job shop, photographer Todd Schuett of Creative Technology produced this composite image conveying the frequency with which plant manager Luke Niels conducts ad hoc coaching sessions on the shop floor.

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To illustrate our article about the commitment to training at Progressive Turnings, a Chicago-area job shop, photographer Todd Schuett of Creative Technology produced this composite image conveying the frequency with which plant manager Luke Niels conducts ad hoc coaching sessions on the shop floor.

The altered photo compresses several encounters into one scene, but in reality, of course, each of these encounters took a separate span of time out of the workday.

Mr. Niels can give this time freely and without consequence to himself, because he is a part-owner of the company. In other shops, establishing a culture of training is more difficult. The employee who gives time to teaching others will have less productive output to show for himself at the end of the day, and that may reflect poorly on him.

Does your shop have a system that protects employees against being subtly penalized because they direct some of their time and effort toward training others? 

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We’d rather send you $15 than rely on our crystal ball…

It’s Capital Spending Survey season and the manufacturing industry is counting on you to participate! Odds are that you received our 5-minute Metalworking survey from Modern Machine Shop in your mail or email. Fill it out and we’ll email you $15 to exchange for your choice of gift card or charitable donation. Are you in the U.S. and not sure you received the survey? Contact us to access it.

Help us inform the industry and everybody benefits.

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