5/10/2017 | 1 MINUTE READ

Manufacturing News of Note: May 2017

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AME opens an engineering training department, Kapp Niles launches a new metrology business and more industry news.

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The Ohio facility provides a three-month training environment for new employees and an intensive two-and-a-half-day seminar offering for end users and distributors. 

Allied Machine & Engineering (AME) has opened its new engineering training department, which provides comprehensive, hands-on education programs for new employees, end users and distributors from around the world. The training department instructs new associates in the proper use and application of the company’s tooling in all phases of holemaking solutions in metal. Trainees participate in a three-month technical and hands-on training program focusing on how the tools work and where to apply them in various applications.

For end users and the distributors who support them, the company offers an intense two-and-a-half-day technical educational seminar (TES) featuring classroom and metalcutting demonstrations. These seminars, limited to groups of 15 to 30 attendees, are designed to keep participants abreast of the latest industry trends and the technology offered.

Here is more news to note:


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