3/26/2020 | 1 MINUTE READ

Additive Manufacturer Green Trade Association Hires Executive Director

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Sherry Handel has board-level experience scaling nonprofits in the sustainability and tech startup education and training sectors.

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Sherry Handel

The Additive Manufacturer Green Trade Association (AMGTA), a new green trade group created to promote additive manufacturing, has hired Sherry Handel as its first executive director.

The AMGTA was launched in November 2019 to promote the environmental benefits of additive manufacturing (AM) over traditional methods of manufacturing. The AMGTA is a non-commercial, unaffiliated organization open to any additive manufacturer or industry stakeholder that meets certain criteria relating to sustainability of production or process.

“We founded the AMGTA because too often in additive manufacturing we focus on the cost and time benefits of the technology, and do not equally consider the very real environmental benefits of AM over traditional manufacturing. These benefits include improved end use design utility and improved industrial ecology of the fabrication process itself. The AMGTA’s purpose is to raise awareness of these benefits within end market segments, in order to accelerate the adoption rate of the technology,” says Brian Neff, chairman of the board of directors. “Sherry brings the talent, passion for sustainability, as well as the background and experience required, to execute on the AMGTA’s mission and grow the organization. In her short time here, she has really hit the ground running.”

Ms. Handel has board-level experience scaling nonprofits in the sustainability and tech startup education and training sectors. As executive director of the AMGTA, she will focus on educating the public and industry about the positive environmental benefits of additive manufacturing, promote the adoption of additive manufacturing as an alternative to traditional manufacturing, develop best practices for additive manufacturing, and help the organization’s members grow their businesses and acquire new customers.

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