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4/16/2019 | 1 MINUTE READ

Big Kaiser's Twin Cutter Boring Tools Make Larger Holes

Originally titled 'Boring Tools Make Larger Holes and Eliminate Special Tooling'
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Big Kaiser’s 319SW Twin Cutter series of boring heads can make holes ranging from 0.787" to 8.000".

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According to Big Kaiser, limitations of using milling tools to prepare holes for finishing become apparent as hole depth and volume increase. Designed to address these limitations, the company’s 319SW Twin Cutter series of boring heads can machine holes ranging in diameter from 0.787" to 8.000" as well as perform rough boring and semi-finishing operations. These tools can also eliminate having to make multiple passes on the same bore, the company says, and enable the use of existing smaller tools to create a starting hole. Sometimes, for example, cast parts have more material to remove than was initially expected. Being able to balance- or step-cut with the same boring head helps to minimize tooling and cycle times, says Big Kaiser. 

Accessory insert holders enable the Twin Cutter series to perform auxiliary operations not normally associated with this type of tooling. For example, some parts require several bores to be machined in line with a blended angle in between. Insert holders with an adjustable insert cartridge allow completion of the bore while producing the blend angle in one pass, thus eliminating the need for follow-up tooling such as an angled milling cutter. Back-boring holders can even eliminate the need for expensive dedicated special tools, and face grooving holders allow plunge cutting rather than milling, for a better surface finish, the company explains.

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