12/23/2014 | 1 MINUTE READ

Collaborative Robots Adapt Safety Settings to the Application

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Universal Robots’ third-generation UR5 and UR10 robot arms are based on previous generations but are equipped with new, adjustable, safety-rated functions as well as true absolute encoders.

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Universal Robots’ third-generation UR5 and UR10 robot arms are based on previous generations but are equipped with new, adjustable, safety-rated functions as well as true absolute encoders. Other enhancements included 16 additional digital I/Os, doubling the number of built-in I/Os. According to the company, the I/Os can be easily configured as digital or safety signals. The control box has a revised design and a rebuilt controller to simplify connecting additional equipment. As in past generations, both lightweight robot arms feature six joints, and the UR5 has a payload of 5 kg, while the UR10 offers 10 kg.

The collaborative robot arms can operate in reduced mode when a human enters the workcell and then resume full speed when the human leaves, or they can operate at full speed inside a CNC machine and at reduced speed when outside. Eight functions are monitored by the safety system to determine when to switch between normal and reduced-safety mode: joint positions and speeds, TCP positions, orientation, speed, force, and the robot’s momentum and power. Settings can only be changed in a password-protected area. The true-absolute encoders enable faster startups and easier integration with other machinery. The robot’s position is recognized upon startup without using battery power, avoiding the need to frequently reinitialize the arms.

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