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Compact HMC Offers Accuracy for Small Parts

Kitamura Machinery’s Mycenter-HX250G horizontal machining center (HMC) is designed for medium- and long-run small parts that require high accuracy and productivity.

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Kitamura Machinery’s Mycenter-HX250G horizontal machining center (HMC) is designed for medium- and long-run small parts that require high accuracy and productivity. The machine provides ±0.000079" full stroke accuracy and ±0.000039" repeatability. The HMC’s15-hp, 15,000-rpm, #30-taper dual-contact spindle offers 51.6 foot-pounds of torque and 220 psi coolant through the spindle for high-velocity machining on a range of materials.
 
The machining center offers a maximum workpiece size of 13.8" in diameter by 15.7" tall, and is equipped with a two-station, 180-degree rotating pallet-change system and a full fourth-axis rotary table for multi-part tombstone fixturing. The HMC can handle four-sided tombstones as large as 15.7" tall and 10" wide, and weighing as much as 220 lbs. Multiple workpieces can be machined while another tombstone is being unloaded and reloaded with new parts.
 
The center is equipped with high speed rapids of 1,890 ipm on the X, Y and Z axes and a 40-tool “fixed pot” automatic toolchanger with 100 tools available as an option. The high speed Arumatik-Mi controller offers the potential for fifth-axis simultaneous machining capabilities on both pallets. Kitamura’s Intelligent Advanced Control System and the spindle oil-cooling unit are said to reduce heat displacement while enabling maximum cutting gains in precision cutting operations.

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