8/5/2008

Drill And Chamfer In A Single Operation

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The Vex-S drilling and chamfering tool combines the company’s Snap chamfering system with the Vex twist drill in order to drill and front/back chamfer a through-hole in a single operation. The combination tool offers a solid carbide, replaceable twist drill tip with the company’s Vex cutting geometry, which is desi

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HEULE Precision Tools will be exhibiting new technology at IMTS 2020 in Chicago this September.

Plan to meet up with their team or get registered here!

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The Vex-S drilling and chamfering tool combines the company’s Snap chamfering system with the Vex twist drill in order to drill and front/back chamfer a through-hole in a single operation. The combination tool offers a solid carbide, replaceable twist drill tip with the company’s Vex cutting geometry, which is designed to create short clips in steel, aluminum and other long chipping material. It also has a helix chip gullet for chip evacuation. This self-centering drill tip features a Helica coating for extended tool life and can be reground and recoated for maximum cost effectiveness. The tool is suited for short hole drilling and smaller sizes, and it is available from 5 to 10.5 mm. The company offers 1 × D tooling from stock, while 2 × D and specials are available upon request.

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