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11/1/2018

Exchangeable-Tip Drill Line Gets New PVD Grades

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Sandvik Coromant is releasing three new grades for its CoroDrill 870 exchangeable-tip drill.

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Sandvik Coromant is releasing three new grades for its CoroDrill 870 exchangeable-tip drill. GC4344, GC3334 and GC2334 have been developed to provide significant tool life improvements and more predictable wear patterns while maintaining high penetration rates and productivity. The new grades are produced with Zertivo, a PVD production technology developed by Sandvik Coromant. Zertivo technology is said to amplify the benefits of the grades, maintaining the advantageous properties of its predecessors and bringing out significant improvements when it comes to properties such as edge line security, chipping resistance and overall wear resistance.

Available in various geometries, the latest grades are described as versatile, covering applications in most ISO materials, although they are optimized for ISO P (steel), ISO M (stainless steel) and ISO K (cast iron). All grades are PVD-coated using Zertivo and are designed to deliver specific enhancements related to common wear issues in drilling.

Designed for the intermediate hole-tolerance range of H9-H10, the CoroDrill 870 exchangeable-tip drill is designed to save time and reduce cost per hole. The drills can be tailored to best support applications through a selection of diameter, length, step and chamfer. CoroDrill 870 is available in a diameters ranging from 10 to 33 mm (0.394" to 1.299") and in depth capacity ranging from 3×D to 12×D.

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