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4/7/2017

Five-Axis Machine Features Inverting Mill-Turn Table

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Eastec 2017: Based on a horizontal machining center platform popular with automotive OEMs, Grob Systems’ G-series universal machining is designed for manufacturers in medical, aerospace, tool and mold, and other industries.

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Based on a horizontal machining center platform popular with automotive OEMs, Grob Systems’ G-series universal machining is designed for manufacturers in medical, aerospace, tool and mold, and other industries. It features a mill-turn table with 225 degrees of rotation in the A axis and continuous 360 degrees in the B axis. This range of motion enables users to completely invert the table for upside-down machining while chips simply free fall away from the part.

Maximum part height is 610 mm (24.0"), and the longest tool length is 500 mm (19.7"). A retractable spindle design helps accommodate long tools with no interference, even with the largest possible workpiece, the company says.

The machining center is available with a mill-turning option for parts ranging to 900 mm (35.4") in diameter. The high-speed mill-turn table rotates at 800 rpm. Part balancing cycles can be run on the machine prior to making parts.

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