• MMS Youtube
  • MMS Facebook
  • MMS Linkedin
  • MMS Twitter
4/7/2017

Five-Axis Machine Features Inverting Mill-Turn Table

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Eastec 2017: Based on a horizontal machining center platform popular with automotive OEMs, Grob Systems’ G-series universal machining is designed for manufacturers in medical, aerospace, tool and mold, and other industries.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Related Suppliers

Based on a horizontal machining center platform popular with automotive OEMs, Grob Systems’ G-series universal machining is designed for manufacturers in medical, aerospace, tool and mold, and other industries. It features a mill-turn table with 225 degrees of rotation in the A axis and continuous 360 degrees in the B axis. This range of motion enables users to completely invert the table for upside-down machining while chips simply free fall away from the part.

Maximum part height is 610 mm (24.0"), and the longest tool length is 500 mm (19.7"). A retractable spindle design helps accommodate long tools with no interference, even with the largest possible workpiece, the company says.

The machining center is available with a mill-turning option for parts ranging to 900 mm (35.4") in diameter. The high-speed mill-turn table rotates at 800 rpm. Part balancing cycles can be run on the machine prior to making parts.

RELATED CONTENT

  • The Challenges of Machining Glass-Filled Plastics

    Plastics reinforced with glass present more machining variables to manage than conventional metals. This shop has developed a process to overcome those challenges and has become more adroit at short-run work along the way.

  • Don’t Forget The Drawbar

    The force that holds the toolholder in the machining center's spindle can weaken over time. If you haven't checked drawbar force in a while, this may be the weak link in your process.

  • Milling with Air

    ... not to mention grinding with air. Thanks to high speed spindles powered by shop air, this job shop expands the work its VMCs can do.

Resources