5/26/2010 | 1 MINUTE READ

Five-Axis Machining Centers

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Heller Machine Tools’ F series five-axis HMCs feature HSK 63 and #40 spindle tapers and three different workhead configurations.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Related Suppliers

Heller Machine Tools’ F series five-axis HMCs feature HSK 63 and #40 spindle tapers and three different workhead configurations. The machine combines simultaneous machining in five axes, which is ideal for complex contouring, with a high-torque spindle to complete complex, difficult-to-machine parts in a single setup, the company says. With three different high-performance spindles, the range is suited for materials ranging from aluminum to titanium in the medical, aerospace, power generation and mold and die industries.
 
The FP 2000 and FP 4000 five-axis machining centers feature pallet changers designed for five-sided machining. The company also offers the FT 2000 and FT 4000, two classic workshop machines with fixed tables. These machines offer high cutting capacity with quality surface finish, the company says. It adds that the design and accessibility of the work area make these two machines useful for a range of parts in different materials. A C-head or tilting head provides the fifth axis.
 
Both machine types feature the same axis arrangement as the previously introduced H series, with a rotary table B axis. The FT 2000 and FP 2000 models offer X, Y and Z strokes of 630 × 630 × 830 mm, while the FT 4000 and FP 4000 models provide X, Y and Z strokes of 800 × 800 × 1,000 mm.
 
Rapid traverse rates range to more than 2,300 ipm with acceleration of nearly 20 sq. ft. per sec. To reduce cycle times, the tool changer achieves 3.5 sec. chip-to-chip times, and the rotary tables support payloads of more than 1,700 lbs. All axes are ballscrew driven.
 
Three spindle designs are available: the PCU 63 power cutting, high-torque, universal head for high-performance cutting; the SCU 63 speed cutting universal head; and the SCT 63 speed cutting tilt spindle for high speed cutting.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Increase Machining Efficiency through Machine Monitoring

    A manufacturer that is distinctive for its attention to in-cycle machining productivity describes its efforts to obtain efficiency improvements outside of the machining cycle. The shop’s primary tool is a simple, daily, graphical recap that illustrates when each machine tool was and was not making parts.

  • Cutting Spiral Bevel Gears On A Five-Axis Machining Center

    To produce high-precision ring gears in low- to mid-volumes, an emerging option is the use of five-axis machining centers. Mitsui Seiki CNC vertical and horizontal machining centers are being used in this application.

  • Composites Machining for the F-35

    Lockheed Martin’s precision machining of composite skin sections for the F-35 provides part of the reason why this plane saves money for U.S. taxpayers. That machining makes the plane compelling in ways that have led other countries to take up some of the cost. Here is a look at a high-value, highly engineered machining process for the Joint Strike Fighter aircraft.

Resources