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2/21/2019

Five-Axis Vertical Machining Center Features Robot Interface

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Eastec 2019: The MX-520 PC4 is designed in response to customer demand seeking a Matsuura automation solution for the MX-520.

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Yamazen will showcase Matsuura’s MX-520 PC4 five-axis VMC in its booth. The MX-520 PC4 is designed in response to customer demand seeking a Matsuura automation solution for the MX-520. The machine is equipped with 90 tools and an installed Universal Robot Interface to maximize its automation potential. The machine is described as offering ease of use and reliable five-axis machining. The MX series of which it is a part is marketed as delivering machine versatility, high accuracy, reliability and cost-efficient performance. 

The Matsuura MX-520 is designed for high rigidity, offering a large machining envelope. The vertical machining center is also available in an assortment of configurations in order to accommodate all applications, industries and materials. Designed with a RAM type structure, the machine has a compact footprint with ergonomic features said to enable rapid setup and processing of complex parts.

The company says the MX-520 is a cost-effective machine for three-axis users making the transition to full five-axis operation. 

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