• MMS Youtube
  • MMS Facebook
  • MMS Linkedin
  • MMS Twitter
12/22/2015

Force, Torque Sensor for Industrial Robots Protected Against Dust, Spray

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

ATI Industrial Automation’s Capacitive F/T Sensor for industrial robots, pressing force control, grinding, deburring and other applications is intended to be a low-cost option for measuring the six components of force and torque in the X, Y and Z axes.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Related Suppliers

ATI Industrial Automation’s Capacitive F/T Sensor for industrial robots, pressing force control, grinding, deburring and other applications is intended to be a low-cost option for measuring the six components of force and torque in the X, Y and Z axes. The sensor is IP65-rated for protection against dust and water spray, and hard mechanical stops provide overload protection. The sensor’s force range is 45 foot-pounds (200 N) and its torque range is 35 inch-pounds (4 Nm).

Output options include an Ethernet conversion box that enables connection to Ethernet networks and USB conversion cables that enable connection to a personal computer or other device. The box is powered by the USB output and RS-422 serial connection, which provides unterminated wires for data signals and user 5 VDC power input.

The company also offers a range of custom and standard silicon strain gage-based sensor models from 17 to 330 mm. All of ATI’s F/T sensors feature a compact design, hardened stainless steel construction, high-speed output, overload protection, span temperature compensation options and high signal-to-noise ratio.  

RELATED CONTENT

  • Flexible Robot Arm Boosts Production

    By incorporating Universal Robot’s UR5 robot arm into its production process, RSS Manufacturing & Phylrich was able to take on a new job and free 30 percent more capacity from existing machines.

  • CNC Robotics And Automation: Knowing When To Say 'When'

    In metalworking, a shop's move from one level of automation to the next can be a business-busting decision if badly timed. This article looks at what you should consider when taking the next step toward automating an operation.

  • Making Strides To Maximize Worker Efficiency

    This 40-year-old shop combines original best practices with new technologies and manufacturing approaches to make the most of its home-grown skilled labor.

Related Topics

Resources