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12/13/2013

Friction Stir Welders Capable of Jointing Difficult Alloys

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Precision Technologies Group (PTG) Heavy Industries will display its Powerstir friction stir welder.

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Precision Technologies Group (PTG) Heavy Industries offers its Powerstir friction stir welder. The welder uses frictional heat combined with precise forging pressure to produce full-penetration welded joints. Due to the low welding temperature, the process is said to avoid mechanical distortion and provide an improved surface finish. According to the company, the welder is capable of producing strong welded joints with structural rigidity, even in alloys that are difficult to weld. It is well-suited for applications such as manufacturing railway car bodies.

The company also offers an online resource page with additional information on friction stir welding, available at holroyd.com/heavy-industries/new-machines/friction-stir-welding.php.

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