11/7/2016

Hydraulic Expansion Toolholder Transfers 520 Nm of Torque

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Schunk’s Tendo E Compact toolholder eliminates the need for different holder technologies for milling, drilling and reaming.

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Schunk’s Tendo E Compact toolholder eliminates the need for different holder technologies for milling, drilling and reaming. This hydraulic expansion toolholder can safely transfer torques ranging to 520 Nm (384 foot-pounds) at a 20-mm clamping diameter and is well-suited for high-volume cutting. With good vibration damping and runout accuracy of less than 0.003 mm (0.0001") at 2.5×D, the Tendo E Compact protects the machine spindle and the cutting tool from damage. The hydraulic expansion toolholder is suitable for applications ranging from rough milling to finish operations such as reaming and fine milling, the company says.

Tools can quickly be changed with an allen key, making this hydraulic expansion toolholder an alternative for operations where the toolholder quantities do not justify peripheral equipment purchases. Common spindle connections are available, including HSK-A63, SK40, BT40, CAT40, and CAT50 interfaces.

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