2/8/2010

Machine-Ready Blanks Save Time

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 According to the supplier, its machine-ready blanks reduce overall part costs.

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According to the supplier, its machine-ready blanks reduce overall part costs. They can be loaded directly into the machine without prep operations such as sawing, grinding, flattening or squaring. Additionally, less time is spent adjusting setups and fixture offsets. Ending prep time and minimizing setup time improves operator and machine productivity as well as throughput capacity, the company says.
 
Tolerance is guaranteed as close as ±0.0005" dimensionally and ±0.0002" in flatness, squareness and parallelism. The blanks are processed using double-disc grinding, blanchard grinding, duplex milling and sub operations such as flattening, deburring and surface improvement.

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