8/9/2013

Portable CNC Machining Center Performs Secondary Operations

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Southwestern Industries will release its TRAK 2OP portable machining center designed for second-operation machining.

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TRAK Machine Tools will be exhibiting new technology at IMTS 2020 in Chicago this September.

Plan to meet up with their team or get registered here!

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Southwestern Industries will release its TRAK 2OP portable machining center designed for second-operation machining. The compact 2.5 × 4-ft. unit is said to streamline a shop’s workflow by bringing an additional spindle to an operator idled by the cycle time of a primary machine. When paired with a primary machine, the portable machining center can perform less-complex secondary operations to reduce part cycle times, decrease operator idle time and simplify scheduling.

The machining center features the company’s ProtoTrak CNC technology with conversational language programming. Programs for second-operation machining tasks such as drilling, countersinking and profile machining can be generated at the machine or remotely. An eight-station toolchanger avoids the need for manual tool changes, while built-in Jergens ball locks facilitate quick change-overs. A pallet jack enables the movement of the portable unit.

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