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Sensor Enables Roughness Measurements on CMMs

IMTS 2018: The Zeiss Rotos roughness sensor enables the use of CMMs to inspect surface waviness and roughness, even on complex workpieces.

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The Zeiss Rotos roughness sensor enables a coordinate measuring machines (CMM) to  inspect surface waviness and roughness, even on complex workpieces. The sensor is said to simplify and speed the measurement of surface parameters in a single measurement cycle without reclamping.

The sensor checks the size, form and location tolerances along with roughness parameters. Significant form deviations can be analyzed on the company’s Prismo and CenterMax CMMs, rather than on separate stylus instruments. The sensor can be exchanged as needed using an interface on the CMM probe. Depending on the measuring machine and the particular stylus, the sensor can capture Ra roughness values as fine as 0.03 microns.

The sensor’s design enables inspection of many workpiece characteristics. With three rotatable, multiple-stylus arms, it measures deep boreholes and difficult-to-reach surfaces and overhead measurements. The sensor also features skidless styli for measuring roughness and waviness on sealing faces. Programming the surface parameters is integrated in the company’s Calypso measuring software.

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