| 1 MINUTE READ

Sensor Enables Roughness Measurements on CMMs

IMTS 2018: The Zeiss Rotos roughness sensor enables the use of CMMs to inspect surface waviness and roughness, even on complex workpieces.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

The Zeiss Rotos roughness sensor enables a coordinate measuring machines (CMM) to  inspect surface waviness and roughness, even on complex workpieces. The sensor is said to simplify and speed the measurement of surface parameters in a single measurement cycle without reclamping.

The sensor checks the size, form and location tolerances along with roughness parameters. Significant form deviations can be analyzed on the company’s Prismo and CenterMax CMMs, rather than on separate stylus instruments. The sensor can be exchanged as needed using an interface on the CMM probe. Depending on the measuring machine and the particular stylus, the sensor can capture Ra roughness values as fine as 0.03 microns.

The sensor’s design enables inspection of many workpiece characteristics. With three rotatable, multiple-stylus arms, it measures deep boreholes and difficult-to-reach surfaces and overhead measurements. The sensor also features skidless styli for measuring roughness and waviness on sealing faces. Programming the surface parameters is integrated in the company’s Calypso measuring software.

Related Topics

RELATED CONTENT

  • Surface Finish: A Machinist's Tool. A Design Necessity.

    Simple "roughness" measurements remain useful in the increasingly stringent world of surface finish specifications. Here's a look at why surface measurement is important and how to use sophisticated portable gages to perform inspections on the shop floor.

  • DFGT - Double Flank Gear Testing

    Functional gear testing, also known as total radial composite deviation, is a method of looking at the total effect of gear errors. This test method simulates the conditions under which a set of gears is likely to operate as a result of the gears meshing together.

  • How Accurate Is Your Machining Center?

    Virtually every machine tool builder lists, as part of a machine's specification, accuracy and repeatability figures. What's generally not given is the method used to arrive at the figures. Though these methods are defined in linear positioning standards, not all builders use the same standards.